Remote Teaching Scenarios

This page is intended to provide you options for remote teaching in a variety of scenarios. That is to say, the information here will show you how to combine a variety of strategies for online learning to accomplish your teaching goals. Each scenario provides ideas for ways to use particular teaching technologies to help enhance the learning environment, as well as considerations to make the experience run more smoothly for you and your students.

Accessibility of course materials is important as it enhances all learning environments. Please see our Answers to Faculty Questions for more information on maintaining accessibility in the transition to remote teaching.

For more basic information on remote teaching tools, the Covid-19 Remote Teaching page offers an introduction to the main teaching strategies and technologies available.

Live Lecture | Recorded Lecture | Live Studio | Recorded Studio | Live Seminar | Recorded Seminar | Teaching Online Labs


Live Lecture

If you want to present lecture material synchronously (for instance at the same time your face-to-face class would ordinarily meet - with students all present at the same time), these are strategies for using teaching technologies to create a similar atmosphere in a remote learning environment.

Strategies

  • Communicate live lecture information through Canvas Announcements
  • Post course materials in Canvas before a live session
  • Use Zoom to set up and start the live session (and record it)
  • Use Zoom Breakouts during the live session to have students discuss with a partner or in small groups, and then share with the class
  • Option: Use either Zoom or iClicker Polls to poll students and gather feedback
  • Option: Set up a Canvas Discussion for students to share their ideas, experiences, and resources after the live session as homework
  • Use Canvas Assignments to collect homework before or after the live session

Considerations

  • Be sure your notifications and other communication software are turned off during your lecture
  • Set up a dry run to test and practice your set-up
  • Assign someone to moderate the chat window if using
  • Be sure to record your lecture to make it available later
  • Turn off your camera to save bandwidth when needed
  • Have a backup plan in case the technology fails

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Recorded Lecture

If you want to present lecture material asynchronously (without any time constraints on when students engage with the content), these are strategies for using teaching technologies to post your content in a remote learning environment.

Strategies

  • Record your lecture in Panopto
  • Post your lecture in Canvas in Pages, Discussions, or Assignments
  • Post Course materials in Canvas
  • Set up a Canvas Discussion for students to share their ideas, experiences, and resources
  • Use Canvas Assignments to assign homework for the lecture OR Use Canvas Quizzes to create a quiz on the lecture topic
  • Communicate lecture information in Canvas Announcements

Considerations

  • Consider writing a script or a detailed outline before recording your lecture

  • Turn on your camera for a human touch
  • Share expectations for viewing the lecture and posting to discussions
  • Post your slides as a separate file
  • Consider posting audio streams of your lectures if appropriate

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Live Studio

Running a studio class presents a unique set of challenges, and the strategies below can help you run one synchronously (with you and all students present online at the same time) in a remote environment.

Strategies

  • Post course materials in Canvas
  • Communicate studio information in Canvas Announcements
  • Use Zoom to set up and start the live studio session (and record it)
  • Option: Use Zoom Breakouts during the live session to have students discuss
  • Option: Use either Zoom or iClicker Polls to poll students and gather feedback
  • Option: Set up a Canvas Discussion for students to share their ideas, experiences, or resources after the live session as homework
  • Use Canvas Assignments to collect homework or projects before or after the live session

Considerations

  • Check with your department regarding access to and distribution of studio materials

  • Be sure your notifications and other communication software are turned off during your live studio
  • Set up a dry run to test and practice your set-up
  • Assign someone to moderate the chat window if using
  • Be sure to record your studio session to make it available later
  • Turn off your camera to save bandwidth when needed
  • Have a backup plan in case the technology fails

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Recorded Studio

Running a studio class presents a unique set of challenges, and the strategies below can help you run one asynchronously (without any time constraints on when students engage with the content) in a remote environment.

Strategies

  • Record your studio instruction in Panopto
  • Post your recording in Canvas in Pages, Discussions, or Assignments
  • Post course materials in Canvas
  • Set up a Canvas Discussion for students to demonstrate their work
  • Use Canvas Assignments to collect homework or projects
  • Communicate studio session information in Canvas Announcements

Considerations

  • Check with your department regarding access to and distribution of studio materials

  • Consider writing a script or a detailed outline before recording your studio instruction
  • Have your camera turned on for human touch
  • Share expectations for viewing the recording and posting discussions
  • Post your slides as a separate file

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Live Seminar

The typically smaller size of a seminar allows you to take advantage of a wide range of options in engaging with course materials.  Some of these options require special considerations in a remote teaching environment. The strategies below are for teaching a seminar synchronously (with you and the students present in the remote environment at the same time).

Strategies

  • Communicate live seminar information in Canvas Announcements
  • Post seminar materials in Canvas before the live seminar
  • Use Zoom to set up and start the live seminar (and record it)
  • Use Zoom Breakouts during the live session to have students discuss with a partner or in small groups, and then share with the class
  • Option: Use either Zoom or iClicker Polls to poll students and gather feedback
  • Set up a Canvas Discussion for students to share their ideas, experiences, or resources after the live seminar
  • Use Canvas Assignments to collect homework or papers before or after the live seminar
  • Use peer assessment techniques and Turnitin to generate feedback for student work

Considerations

  • Be sure your notifications and other communication software are turned off during the live seminar

  • Set up a dry-run to test and practice your set-up.
  • Assign someone to moderate the chat window if using
  • Be sure to record your live meeting to make it available later
  • Turn off your camera to save bandwidth when needed
  • Have a backup plan in case the technology fails

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Recorded Seminar

Recording a seminar allows you to engage your students in complex course materials without the time constraints of synchronous teaching. These strategies will help you teach a seminar asynchronously in a remote teaching environment.

Strategies

  • Record your seminar content in Panopto
  • Post your recording in Canvas in Pages, Discussions, or Assignments
  • Post seminar materials in Canvas
  • Set up a Canvas Discussion for students to share their ideas, experiences, and resources
  • Use Canvas Assignments to assign homework or collect papers
  • Communicate seminar information in Canvas Announcements

Considerations

  • Consider writing a script or a detailed outline before recording your seminar content

  • Turn on your camera for a human touch
  • Share expectations for viewing content and to posting discussions
  • Post your slides as a separate file

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Teaching Online Labs

Instructional methods for assessing and teaching concepts from a laboratory-based course may include topics like using methods and equipment, analyzing results and data, and conducting experiments.

When planning to teach labs online:

  • first, prioritize your course goals and evaluate (What has been done so far? And, what’s left to do?)
  • next, examine your learning outcomes that have not been achieved yet (Could students achieve this learning outcome? If yes, how? If no, is there an acceptable alternative?)
  • then, determine how you can assess student learning and provide feedback on their progress (What evidence could you collect that students have met your learning goals?)
  • finally, implement instructional materials and activities to reach course goals and achieve learning outcomes (What on-line resources are available? What can I make myself? What on-line instruction would help students achieve specific learning outcomes? How they can practice these skills?)

Resources: